From A to F: Is the Student Really the Teacher?

From A to F:  Is the Student Really the Teacher?

Students in schools aren’t learning in the ways they could, can or need to . But  their teachers don’t know that. Why?

What can these students do to help them and even their peers learn?

Many colleges are taking annual surveys from the students about their teachers. Some say things like;

“I really like this teacher, I just don’t think he knows enough about what he’s teaching.”

Others say things like;

“This class is a waste of my time and money!”

Ouch! I would hate to be that teacher, but even worse I would hate to be that student. If some students felt that they weren’t learning anything in one of their classes, they would be pretty bummed, because maybe they chose the class to learn something new, or to learn a life skill. What if that was a required class for the career that they had in mind, and weren’t learning the things they were required to know?

Sean Decatur; Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, and a professor of chemistry and biochemistry at Oberlin College has been through “evaluation day” and finds that there is value to the evaluation process. Decatur cannot imagine evaluating teaching (both his own and a colleagues) without any input from students.

“The students may not be experienced pedagogues, but they ARE experienced learners. Their insights into the classroom are often thoughtful, clear and cogent.”

This quote by Sean is just a perfect example of why it’s a good idea for students to grade their teachers. They know what they want and need, and when they tell their teachers, they can get it.

 About the Author

Carly Broome, a 6th grader at Canyon Vista Middle School.   She Swims, and rides horses.  Her favorite book is Ashes, Ashes, by Jo Treggari.  Broome also loves Country music more than she loves macaroni.  And that’s hard to beat.

Works Cited

“Student Evaluations and Other Insights About Professors …” 2012. 5 Mar. 2015.

 

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